Book chapter

Religious Regulation in Poland (2019)

in: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics

Abstract

It is a truism to say that most Poles are Catholic. Yet, there is also a large number of other churches and religious organizations that are currently registered with the Polish state, although they are very small in the number of adherents they boast. In comparison with other churches and religious organizations, the Catholic Church is a uniquely important social and political actor today and has played an important role in Poland's over millennium-long history. A brief review of the history of the Catholic Church in Polish society and politics helps illustrate how the Catholic Church has come to play the role it plays in present-day Poland. At present, its relationship to the Polish state is formally outlined in the Constitution, several statutes concerning religion, the country's criminal code, and an international agreement with the Vatican known as the concordat. Three issues—religious education in public schools, the relationship between the Church and state finances, and the Church's openness to new religious movements—illustrate how the Catholic Church and state in Poland interact in practice. More informally, religious expression in the country's public square provides further insight into the relationship between church and state in Poland.