Book

In the name of security - secrecy, surveillance and journalism (2018)

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Abstract

The terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York on 11 September 2001 saw the start of the so-called war on terror. The aim of 'In the Name of Security - Secrecy, Surveillance and Journalism' is to assess the impact of surveillance and other security measures on in-depth public interest journalism. How has the global fear-driven security paradigm sparked by 11 September affected journalism? At the core of the book sits what the authors have labeled the 'trust us dilemma'. Governments justify passing, at times, oppressive and far-reaching anti-terror laws to keep citizens safe from terror. By doing so governments are asking the public to trust their good intentions and the integrity of the security agencies. But how can the public decide to trust the government and its agencies if it does not have access to information on which to base its decision? 'In the Name of Security - Secrecy, Surveillance and Journalism' takes an internationally comparative approach using case studies from the powerful intelligence-sharing group known as the Five Eyes consisting of the US, Canada, the UK, Australia and New Zealand. Chapters assessing a selection of EU countries and some of the BRICS countries provide additional and important points of comparison to the English-speaking countries that make up the Five Eyes.

Keywords

War on Terrorism, 2001-2009, in mass media, National security, Transparency in government

Languages

English

Publisher

Anthem Press

ISBN

9781783087693

Pages

viii, 261

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