Sammelwerksbeitrag

Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) (2018)

in: Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics

Abstract

Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) is one of the most important policy areas of the European Union (EU). Academic research on EMU in political science is well-established and ever-evolving, like EMU itself. There are three main "waves" of research on EMU, which have mostly proceeded in a chronological order. The first wave of scholarly work has focused on the "road" to EMU, from the setting up of the European Monetary System in 1979 to the third and final stage of EMU in 1999. This literature has explained why and how EMU was set up and took the "asymmetric" shape it did, that is to say, a full "monetary union," whereby monetary policy was conducted by a single monetary authority, the European Central Bank (ECB), but "economic union" was not fully fledged. The second wave of research has discussed the functioning of EMU in the 2000s, its effects and defects. EMU brought about significant changes in the member states of the euro area, even though these effects varied across macroeconomic policies and across countries. The third wave of research on EMU has concerned the establishment of Banking Union from 2012 onward. This literature has explained why and how Banking Union was set up and took the "asymmetric" shape it did, whereby banking supervision was transferred to the ECB, but banking resolution partly remained at the national level, while other components of Banking Union, namely a common deposit guarantee scheme and a common fiscal backstop, were not set up. Subsequently, the research has begun to explore the functioning of Banking Union and its effects on the participating member states.